Optometric vision therapy has been proven to be an effective treatment for many types of problems affecting the vision system. The conditions we commonly treat include, but not limited to, conditions involving binocularity, accommodation, oculomotor disorders and visual perceptual-motor dysfunctions.

Our vision therapy services include the diagnosis, treatment and management of such disorders and dysfunctions of the vision system. We will complete an assessment in-office and formulate the proper treatment plan based on the findings. We will sit down with you to discuss the details. Based on the length of treatment, will typically complete periodic assessments to monitor progress.

The exact length and nature of the therapy program varies with the specific complexity of the diagnosed condition. On average, vision therapy sessions are one or two office visits per week (1-hour sessions) lasting between 6 weeks to 12 weeks long.

Common Visual System Disorders

  1. Accommodative Disorders – A sensory and neuromuscular anomaly of the visual system. It is characterized by inadequate focusing accuracy, reduced ability to stimulate and relax focusing system quickly, reduced focusing amount and inability to
    sustain focusing.
    • Symptoms may include eye strain, intermittent blurred vision, abnormal fatigue, headaches, difficulty prolonged near work and pain in or around the eyes.
  2. Amblyopia – developmental disorder of spatial vision. It is characterized by reduced best corrected vision occurs along with reduced processing of visual information.
    • Symptoms may include reduced vision in one or both eyes, reduced depth perception and spatial unawareness.
  3. Binocular Vision Disorders – A sensorimotor anomaly of the visual system. It is characterized by the inability to either efficiently, accurately and comfortably sustain binocular vision.
    • Symptoms may include eye strain, headache, pain in and around the eyes, double vision, abnormal posture adaption, abnormal working distances, inaccurate depth perception, dizziness with prolonged near work, motion sickness.
  4. Convergence Excess – A sensorimotor anomaly of the binocular vision system. It is characterized by an overactive response to near stimulus causing the eyes to converge (turn inward) more than needed to see single and clear.
    • Symptoms may include eye strain, headache, inability to sustain prolonged near work, double vision, intermittent blur, pain in or around the eyes, abnormal fatigue and dizziness.
  5. Convergence Insufficiency – a sensorimotor anomaly of the visual system. It is characterized by an underactive response to near stimulus causing the eyes to converge (turn inward) less than needed to see single and clear.
    • Symptoms may include double vision, eyestrain, intermittent blur, inability to sustain prolonged near work, abnormal fatigue, headache, pain in and around the eyes and dizziness.
  6. Oculomotor Dysfunction – a sensorimotor anomaly of the ocular motor system. It is characterized by inaccurate eye movements either monocularly or binocularly, in pursuits, saccades, and fixations.
    • Symptoms most commonly include loss of place when reading, skipping lines and complete words. Other symptoms include difficulty following moving objects, poor academic performance, reduced efficiency with school work, poor attention span and
      motion sickness.
  7. Strabismus – a sensorimotor anomaly of the binocular system. It is characterized by failure to maintain eye alignment that can either cause an outward deviation, inward deviation or vertical deviation of the non-fixating eye.
    • Symptoms may include intermittent or constant eye deviation, double vision, poor spatial judgement, consistent head tilt/turn and covering of one eye to focus.